Professional Psychology Program

We at the George Washington University Doctor of Psychology Program warmly welcome you to explore and examine all that we have to offer.  

The Psychology Program is composed of four years of education and training in clinical psychology—usually a full time, three year curriculum in residence at GW followed by a year of full time internship. Those who successfully complete both components are granted the Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) degree in Clinical Psychology. The program is a free-standing program (not a department) within the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. It follows the "practitioner-scholar" model of education within the local clinical scientist tradition to prepare students for practice-focused careers in Clinical Psychology.

Students receive a breadth and depth of education and training in clinical psychology, focusing on psychodynamic approaches complemented by other perspectives, which combine the extensive practical experience they receive throughout the program with courses, graduated, sequential writing requirements and opportunities for research that integrate practice-based knowledge and skills with the scientific foundations of psychology. Courses are taught by seasoned clinicians, scholars, and researchers. Coursework is designed to be completed within three years of full-time study (fall, spring, and summer sessions each year).  Additionally, this program emphasizes first-hand experience by allowing students immersion into The Center Clinic starting during the fall of their first year.  

After all course work, clinic and scholarly writing requirements are fulfilled, and prior to receiving the PsyD degree, students complete a one-year, full-time internship requirement (or two years, at least half time each year) at a site that meets the requirements of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers. 

Loring Ingraham

Meet the Program Director

Director of the Professional Psychology Program Loring Ingraham specializes in developmental psychopathology, gene-environment interaction and research methodology. Before joining the program as a professor of clinical psychology in 1996, Ingraham received a BA from Yale College, a PhD from Catholic University of America, and a post-doctoral fellowship at the National Institute of Mental Health.

MA in Forensic Psychology

Columbian College now offers a Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology to train the next generation of criminal profilers, competency experts, psychological evaluators, trauma counselors, and related positions. This 37-credit, two-year program offers two tracks: Applied Forensics and Applied Psychology.

LGBT Health & Policy Practice Program

The GWU LGBT Health Policy & Practice Graduate Certificate program trains current and future healthcare leaders to develop strategies that address health issues and reduce health disparities for the LGBT population. Administered by the Professional Psychology Program, the one-year, 12-credit program provides students with a general knowledge of the psychological, medical, and policy-based issues faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) individuals.